The engineer’s iron ring – a reminder of responsibility

By KRYSTLE CHOW
Published in the March 2004 edition of Carleton NOW.
March 2, 2004

Click here to view this article on the Carleton NOW website.

The iron ring is an important reminder of the engineer\'s commitment to safety
The iron ring is an important reminder of the engineer’s commitment to safety.
Photograph taken from the Carleton NOW website.

Rohit Saxena says he is hoping to arrange for his dad to receive his engineering ‘iron ring’ at the same time he receives his own.

Saxena says his father never got a ring because he had studied in England before moving to Canada.

The graduating computer systems engineering student says he is excited about finally getting his ring, and that he’s glad to have had such a well-regarded and recognized symbol to work towards.

The legend of the iron ring itself reflects the toughness of the engineer’s chosen path. The original rings were made from the iron remains of a bridge that collapsed in Quebec due to faulty engineering. The ring is a symbol to remind future engineers of their commitment to society.

Although the rings are no longer made of iron, the tradition is still a large part of every Canadian engineer’s academic life.

“If you go into the Engineering Lounge in the Mackenzie Building, there’s a clock that’s been counting down since the very first day of classes in September,” says the Carleton Student Engineering Society president Angeline Marasse. “People are getting very excited.”

To Bhutan and back

By KRYSTLE CHOW
Published in the March 2004 edition of Carleton NOW.
March 2, 2004

Click here to view this article on the Carleton NOW website.

Angela Sumegi in Bhutan
Angela Sumegi in Bhutan

Last year, Angela Sumegi received a research grant from Carleton University and an opportunity of a lifetime, to study the relationship between Buddhism and Shamanism in Bhutan, a small country about half the size of Newfoundland located between China and India.

Angela Sumegi in Bhutan “I thought that the title of my proposal, ‘Religion in Bhutan’s Phobjikha Valley,’ was pretty esoteric!” says Sumegi, who is extremely grateful that Carleton found her proposal worthwhile.

“I think it reflects Carleton’s wish to support scholastic endeavour in a wide range of fields,” she says. “I think that’s very fortunate for those of us working in areas where the practical benefits of the research may not be immediately obvious.”

Sumegi, an assistant professor in Carleton’s College of the Humanities, had planned to do a preliminary study on the existence of Shamanic activity Continue reading →